Brighton Hill Community School

5b. Safeguarding Policy

Information & Policies

Published on - 07-11-2016

This policy should be read in conjunction with the school’s Child Protection Policy

Policy Statement

Safeguarding determines the actions that we take to keep children safe and protect them from harm in all aspects of their school life. As a school we are committed to safeguarding and promoting the welfare of all of our pupils.

The actions that we take to prevent harm; to promote wellbeing; to create safe environments; to educate on rights, respect and responsibilities; to respond to specific issues and vulnerabilities all form part of the safeguarding responsibilities of the school. As such, this overarching policy will link to other policies which will provide more information and greater detail.  

 

Aims

  • To provide Staff with the framework to promote and safeguard the wellbeing of children and in doing so ensure they meet their statutory responsibilities.
  • To ensure consistent good practice across the school.
  • To demonstrate our commitment to protecting children.

 

Principles and Values

Safeguarding is everyone’s responsibility. As such it does not rest with the Designated Safeguarding Lead (DSL) and their deputies to take a lead responsibility in all of the areas covered within this policy.

Some areas, such as Health and Safety, are a specialist area of safeguarding and a separate lead for this area is in place in the school.

Safeguarding processes are intended to put in place measures that minimise harm to children. There will be situations where gaps or deficiencies in the policies and processes we have in place will be highlighted. In these situations a review will be carried out in order to identify learning and inform the policy, practice and culture of the school.

All pupils in our school are able to talk to any member of staff to share concerns or talk about situations which are giving them worries. The staff will listen to the pupil, take their worries seriously and share the information with the safeguarding lead.
In addition, we provide pupils with information of who they can talk to outside of school both within the community and with local or national organisations who can provide support or help.

As a school, we review this policy at least annually in line with DfE, HSCB, HCC and any other relevant guidance.

Date Approved by Governing Body: October 2016

Next Review: October 2017


Areas of Safeguarding

Within Keeping Children Safe in Education (2016) and the Ofsted inspection guidance (2015), there are a number of safeguarding areas directly highlighted or implied within the text.
These areas of safeguarding have been separated into issues that are emerging or high risk issues (part 1); those related to the pupils as an individual (part 2); other safeguarding issues affecting pupils (part 3); and those related to the running of the school (part 4).

Definitions

Within this document:

‘Safeguarding’ is defined in the Children Act 2004 as protecting from maltreatment; preventing impairment of health and development; ensuring that children grow up with the provision of safe and effective care; and work in a way that gives the best life chances and transition to adult hood. Our safeguarding practice applies to every child.

The term Staff applies to all those working for or on behalf of the school, full time or part time, in either a paid or voluntary capacity. This also includes parents and Governors.

Child refers to all young people who have not yet reached their 18 birthday. On the whole, this will apply to pupils of our school; however the policy will extend to visiting children and students from other establishments

Parent refers to birth parents and other adults in a parenting role for example adoptive parents, guardians, step parents and foster carers.

Key personnel

The designated safeguarding lead for the school is:

Brett Coley
______________________________________________________

The deputy safeguarding leads is:

Liam Lyons (training to be completed January 2017)
______________________________________________________

______________________________________________________

Part 1 – High risk and emerging safeguarding issues

Preventing Radicalisation and Extremism

Protecting children from radicalisation 
Child_subject_violent_extremism
Hampshire Constabulary - Prevent Radicalisation and Extremism

The prevent duty requires that all staff are aware of the signs that a child maybe vulnerable to radicalisation. The risks will need to be considered for political; environmental; animal rights; or faith based extremism that may lead to a child becoming radicalised. All staff have received prevent WRAP training/undertaken e-learning/received awareness training in order that they can identify the signs of children being radicalised.

As part of the preventative process resilience to radicalisation will be built through the promotion of fundamental British values through the curriculum.

Any child who is considered vulnerable to radicalisation will be referred by the DSL to Hampshire children’s social care, where the concerns will be considered in the MASH process. If the police prevent officer considers the information to be indicating a level of risk a “channel panel” will be convened and the school will attend and support this process.

Gender based violence / Violence against women and girls

Violence against women and girls

The government have a strategy looking at specific issues that women and girls face. Within the context of this safeguarding policy the following sections are how we respond to violence against girls. Female genital mutilation, forced marriage, honour based violence and teenage relationship abuse all fall under this strategy.
Female Genital Mutilation (FGM)

Mandatory reporting of female genital mutilation procedural information 
Multi agency statutory guidance on female genital mutilation
http://4lscb.proceduresonline.com/chapters/p_fem_gen_mut.html

FGM comprises all procedures involving partial or total removal of the external female genitalia or other injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons. It has no health benefits and harms girls and women in many ways. It involves removing and damaging healthy and normal female genital tissue, and hence interferes with the natural function of girls’ and women’s bodies.

The age at which girls undergo FGM varies enormously according to the community. The procedure may be carried out when the girl is newborn, during childhood or adolescence, just before marriage or during the first pregnancy. However, the majority of cases of FGM are thought to take place between the ages of 5 and 8 and therefore girls within that age bracket are at a higher risk.
FGM is illegal in the UK.

On the 31 October 2015, it became mandatory for teachers to report known cases of FGM to the police. In these situations, the DSL and/or head will be informed and that the member of teaching staff has called the police to report suspicion that FGM has happened.
At no time will staff examine pupils to confirm this.

For cases where it is believed that a girl may be vulnerable to FGM or there is a concern that she may be about to be genitally mutilated the staff will inform the DSL who will report it as with any other child protection concern.

Forced Marriage

Multi-agency practice guidelines: Handling cases of Forced Marriage 
http://4lscb.proceduresonline.com/chapters/p_forced_marriage.html

In the case of children: ‘a forced marriage is a marriage in which one or both spouses
cannot consent to the marriage and duress is involved. Duress can include physical,
psychological, financial, sexual and emotional pressure.’ In developing countries 11% of girls are married before the age of 15. One in 3 victims of forced marriage in the U.K. are under 18.
It is important that all members of staff recognise the presenting symptoms, how to respond if there are concerns and where to turn for advice.

Advice and help can be obtained nationally through the Forced Marriage Unit and locally through the local police safeguarding team or children’s social care.
Policies and practices in this school reflect the fact that while all members of staff, including teachers, have important responsibilities with regard to pupils who may be at risk of forced marriage, teachers and school leaders should not undertake roles in this regard that are most appropriately discharged by other children’s services professionals such as police officers or social workers.

Characteristics that may indicate forced marriage
While individual cases of forced marriage, and attempted forced marriage, are often very particular, they are likely to share a number of common and important characteristics, including:

On their own, these characteristics may not indicate forced marriage. However, it is important to be satisfied that where these behaviours occur, they are not linked to forced marriage. It is also important to avoid making assumptions about an individual pupil’s circumstances or act on the basis of stereotyping. For example, an extended holiday may be taken for entirely legitimate reasons and may not necessarily represent a pretext for forced marriage.


Honour Based Violence

http://Hampshire Contabulary - honour based violence
http://4lscb.proceduresonline.com/chapters/p_hon_based_vio.html

Honour based violence is a violent crime or incident which may have been committed to protect or defend the honour of the family or community.

It is often linked to family or community members who believe someone has brought shame to their family or community by doing something that is not in keeping with their unwritten rule of conduct. For example, honour based violence might be committed against people who:

Women and girls are the most common victims of honour based violence however it can also affect men and boys. Crimes of ‘honour’ do not always include violence. Crimes committed in the name of ‘honour’ might include:

If staff believe that a pupil is at risk from honour based violence the DSL will follow the usual safeguarding referral process, however, if it is clear that a crime has been committed or the pupil is at immediate risk the police will be contacted in the first place. It is important that if honour based violence is known or suspected that communities and family members are NOT spoken to prior to referral to the police or social care as this could increase risk to the child.

Teenage Relationship Abuse

This is abuse summary report 
Hampshire Constabulary - Healthy relationships
Statutory guidance framework - controlling or-coercive behaviour in an intimate or family relationship

Research has shown that teenagers didn't understand what constituted abusive behaviours such as controlling behaviours, which could escalate to physical abuse, e.g. checking someone's phone, telling them what to wear, who they can/can't see or speak to and that this abuse was prevalent within teen relationships. Further research showed that teenagers didn't understand what consent meant within their relationships. They often held the common misconception that rape could only be committed by a stranger down a dark alley and didn't understand that it could happen within their own relationships.

This led to these abusive behaviours feeling ‘normal’ and therefore left unchallenged as they were not recognised as being abusive.
In response to this the school will provide education to prevent teenagers from becoming victims and perpetrators of abusive relationships by encouraging them to rethink their views of violence, abuse and controlling behaviours, and understand what consent means within their relationships.

The Toxic Trio

The term ‘Toxic Trio’ has been used to describe the issues of domestic violence, mental ill-health and substance misuse which have been identified as common features of families where harm to women and children has occurred.
They are viewed as indicators of increased risk of harm to children and young people. In a review of Serious Cases Reviews undertaken by Ofsted in 2011, they found that in nearly 75% of these cases two or more of the issues were present.

Domestic Abuse

Hampshire Constabulary - secondary domestic abuse
http://4lscb.proceduresonline.com/pdfs/pr_sg_chi_dom_abuse.pdf
http://4lscb.proceduresonline.com/chapters/p_dom_viol.html
Domestic violence and abuse

Domestic abuse is any incident or pattern of incidents of controlling, coercive or threatening behaviour, violence or abuse between those aged 16 or over who are or have been intimate partners or family members regardless of gender or sexuality. This can encompass, but is not limited to, the following types of abuse:

Controlling behaviour is a range of acts designed to make a person subordinate and/or dependent by isolating them from sources of support, exploiting their resources and capacities for personal gain, depriving them of the means needed for independence, resistance and escape and regulating their everyday behaviour. Coercive behaviour is an act or a pattern of acts of assault, threats, humiliation and intimidation or other abuse that is used to harm, punish, or frighten their victim.

Research indicates that living within a home where domestic abuse takes place is harmful to children and can have a serious impact on their behaviour, wellbeing and understanding of what a normal relationship is.

Children witnessing domestic abuse is recognised as ‘significant harm’ in law. These children may become aggressive; display anti-social behaviours; suffer from depression or anxiety; or fail to reach their educational potential.

Indicators that a child is living within a relationship with domestic abuse include:

These behaviours themselves do not indicate that a child is living with domestic abuse, but should be considered as indicators that this may be the case.

If staff believe that a child is living with domestic abuse, this will be reported to the designated safeguarding lead for referral to be considered to children’s social care.

Parental mental health

he mental health strategy for england
http://4lscb.proceduresonline.com/chapters/p_childatrisk_mhpar.html

The term "mental ill health" is used to cover a wide range of conditions, from eating disorders, mild depression and anxiety to psychotic illnesses such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Parental mental illness does not necessarily have an adverse impact on a child's developmental needs, but it is essential to always assess its implications for each child in the family. It is essential that the diagnosis of a parent/carer's mental health is not seen as defining the level of risk. Similarly, the absence of a diagnosis does not equate to there being little or no risk.

For children the impact of parental mental health can include:

If staff become aware of any of the above indicators, or others that suggest a child is suffering due to parental mental health, the information will be shared with the DSL to consider a referral to children’s social care.

Parental Substance misuse

http://4lscb.proceduresonline.com/chapters/p_chil_drug_mis_par.html

Substance misuse applies to the misuse of alcohol as well as 'problem drug use', defined by the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs as drug use which has: 'serious negative consequences of a physical, psychological, social and interpersonal, financial or legal nature for users and those around them.
Parental substance misuse of drugs or alcohol becomes relevant to child protection when substance misuse and personal circumstances indicate that their parenting capacity is likely to be seriously impaired or that undue caring responsibilities are likely to be falling on a child in the family.

For children the impact of parental substance misuse can include:

These behaviours themselves do not indicate that a child’s parent is misusing substances, but should be considered as indicators that this may be the case.

If staff believe that a child is living with parental substance misuse, this will be reported to the designated safeguarding lead for referral to be considered for children’s social care.

Missing, Exploited and Trafficked Children (MET)

http://4lscb.proceduresonline.com/chapters/p_missing_exploit_traff.html

Within Hampshire, the acronym MET is used to identify all children who are missing; believed to be at risk of or being sexually exploited; or who are at risk of or are being trafficked. Given the close links between all of these issues, there has been a considered response to join all three issues so that cross over of risk is not missed.

Children Missing from Education

http://4lscb.proceduresonline.com/chapters/p_child_miss_edu.html 
School attendance 
Children missing_education - Statutory_guidance_for_local_authorities

Patterns of children missing education can be an indicator of either abuse or safeguarding risks. A relatively short length of time a child is missing does not reduce risk of harm to that child, and all absence or non-attendance should be considered with other known factors or concerns.

DSLs and staff should consider:

Missing lessons: Are there patterns in the lessons that are being missed? Is this more than avoidance of a subject or a teacher? Does the child remain on the school site or are they absent from the site?

Single missing days: Is there a pattern in the day missed? Is it before or after the weekend suggesting the child is away from the area? Are there specific lessons or members of staff on these days? Is the parent informing the school of the absence on the day? Are missing days reported back to parents to confirm their awareness?

Continuous missing days: Has the school been able to make contact with the parent? Is medical evidence being provided? Are siblings attending school (either our or local schools)?

The school will view absence as both a safeguarding issue and an educational outcomes issue. The school may take steps that could result in legal action for attendance, or a referral to children’s social care, or both.

Children Missing from Home or Care

Children who run away or go missing from home or care 
Childrens society.org.uk - runaways

Children who run away from home or from care, provide a clear behavioural indication that they are either unhappy or do not feel safe in the place that they are living.
Research shows that children run away from conflict or problems at home or school,
neglect or abuse, or because children are being groomed by predatory individuals who
seek to exploit them. Many run away on numerous occasions.

The association of chief police officers has provided the following definitions and guidance.
“Missing person is: ‘Anyone whose whereabouts cannot be established and where the
circumstances are out of character or the context suggests the person may be the subject of crime or at risk of harm to themselves or another.’

An absent person is: ‘A person not at a place where they are expected or required to be.’

All cases classified as ‘missing’ by the police will receive an active police response – such as deployment of police officers to locate a child. Cases where the child was classified as ‘absent’ will be recorded by the police and risk assessed regularly but no active response will be deployed.
The absent case will be resolved when a young person returns or new information
comes to light suggesting that he/she is at risk. In the latter instance, the case is
upgraded to ‘missing’.

Within any case of children who are missing both push and pull factors will need to be considered.
Push factors include:

Pull factors include:

As a school we will inform all parents of children who are absent (unless the parent has informed us).
If the parent is also unaware of the location of their child, and the definition of missing is met, we will either support the parent to/directly contact the police to inform them.

Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE)

Parents against child sexual exploitation
http://4lscb.proceduresonline.com/chapters/p_sexual_exploit.html

Sexual exploitation of children is not limited by the age of consent and can occur up until the age of 18. CSE involves children being in situations, contexts or relationships where they (or a third person) receive ‘something’ as a result of them performing sexual activities. The something can include food, accommodation, drugs, alcohol, cigarettes, affection, gifts, or money.
Child sexual exploitation can happen via technology without the child’s being aware; for example, being persuaded to post sexual images on the Internet/mobile phones without immediate payment or gain.
In all cases, those exploiting the child/young person have power over them by virtue of their age, gender, intellect, physical strength and/or economic or other resources. Violence, coercion and intimidation are common, involvement in exploitative relationships being characterised in the main by the child or young person’s limited availability of choice resulting from their social/economic and/or emotional vulnerability.

Indicators a child may be at risk of CSE include:

CSE can happen to a child of any age, gender, ability or social status. Often the victim of CSE is not aware that they are being exploited and do not see themselves as a victim.

As a school we educate all staff in the signs and indicators of sexual exploitation. We use the sexual exploitation risk assessment form (SERAF) and associated guidance to identify pupils who are at risk and the DSL will share this information as appropriate with children’s social care.

We recognise that we may have information or intelligence that could be used to both protect children and prevent risk. Any relevant information that we have will be shared on the community partnership information (CPI) form [Annex 3]

Trafficked Children
http://4lscb.proceduresonline.com/chapters/p_safeg_traff_ch.htm

Human trafficking is defined by the UNHCR in respect of children as a process that is a combination of :

Any child transported for exploitative reasons is considered to be a trafficking victim.
There is significant evidence that children (both of UK and other citizenship) are being trafficked internally within the UK and this is regarded as a more common form of trafficking in the UK.
There are a number of indicators which suggest that a child may have been
trafficked into the UK, and may still be controlled by the traffickers or receiving
adults. These are as follows:

For those children who are internally trafficked within the UK indicators include:

These behaviours themselves do not indicate that a child is being trafficked, but should be considered as indicators that this may be the case.

If staff believe that a child is being trafficked, this will be reported to the designated safeguarding lead for referral to be considered to children’s social care.

Technologies
http://4lscb.proceduresonline.com/chapters/p_ca_information.html
Technological hardware and software is developing continuously with an increase in functionality of devices that people use. The majority of children use online tools to communicate with others locally, nationally and internationally. Access to the Internet and other tools that technology provides is an invaluable way of finding, sharing and communicating information. While technology itself is not harmful, it can be used by others to make children vulnerable and to abuse them.

Online Safety
Think You know 
Saferinternet.org.uk

With the current speed of on-line change, some parents and carers have only a limited understanding of online risks and issues. Parents may underestimate how often their children come across potentially harmful and inappropriate material on the internet and may be unsure about how to respond. Some of the risks could be:

The school will therefore seek to provide information and awareness to both pupils and their parents through:


Social media

www.thinkuknow.co.uk 
www.saferinternet.org.uk
www.childnet.com
www.kidsmart.org.uk
www.lgfl.net

With the current speed of on-line change, some parents and carers have only a limited understanding of online risks and issues. Parents may underestimate how often their children come across potentially harmful and inappropriate material on the internet and may be unsure about how to respond. Some of the risks could be:

The school will therefore seek to provide information and awareness to both pupils and their parents through:

Cyberbullying
Cyberbullying - Advice_for_Headteachers_and_School_Staff
Hampshire Constabulary - cyber bullying

Central to the School’s anti-bullying policy should be the principle that ‘bullying is always unacceptable’ and that ‘all pupils have a right not to be bullied’.
The school should also recognise that it must take note of bullying perpetrated outside school which spills over into the school and so we will respond to any cyber-bullying we become aware of carried out by pupils when they are away from the site.
Cyber-bullying is defined as “an aggressive, intentional act carried out by a group or individual using electronic forms of contact repeatedly over time against a victim who cannot easily defend himself/herself.”
By cyber-bullying, we mean bullying by electronic media:

Cyber-bullying may be at a level where it is criminal in character.
It is unlawful to disseminate defamatory information in any media including internet sites.
Section 127 of the Communications Act 2003 makes it an offence to send, by public means of a public electronic communications network, a message or other matter that is grossly offensive or one of an indecent, obscene or menacing character.
The Protection from Harassment Act 1997 makes it an offence to knowingly pursue any course of conduct amounting to harassment.

If we become aware of any incidents of cyberbullying, we will need to consider each case individually as to any criminal act that may have been committed. The school will pass on information to the police if it feels that it is appropriate or are required to do so.

Sexting
www.thinkuknow.co.uk 
Hampshire Constabulary - Safe4me - Sexting 
www.ceop.police.uk - What does sexting mean

'Sexting' often refers to the sharing of naked or ‘nude’ pictures or video through mobile phones and the internet. It also includes underwear shots, sexual poses and explicit text messaging.
While sexting often takes place in a consensual relationship between two young people, the use of Sexted images in revenge following a relationship breakdown is becoming more commonplace. Sexting can also be used as a form of sexual exploitation and take place between strangers.

As the average age of first smartphone or camera enabled tablet is 6 years old, sexting is an issue that requires awareness raising across all ages.

The school will use age appropriate educational material to raise awareness, to promote safety and deal with pressure. Parents should be aware that they can come to the school for advice.


Gaming
www.saferinternet.org.uk
www.childnet.com
www.kidsmart.org.uk
www.lgfl.net

Online gaming is an activity that the majority of children and many adults get involved in. The school will raise awareness:

Online reputation
www.childnet.com
www.saferinternet.org.uk
www.kidsmart.org.uk

Online reputation is the opinion others get of a person when they encounter them online. It is formed by posts, photos that have been uploaded and comments made by others on people’s profiles. It is important that children and staff are aware that anything that is posted could influence their future professional reputation. The majority of organizations and work establishments now check digital footprint before considering applications for positions or places on courses.

Grooming
www.saferinternet.org.uk
www.childnet.com
www.internetmatters.org

Online grooming is the process by which one person with an inappropriate sexual interest in children will approach a child online, with the intention of developing a relationship with that child, to be able to meet them in person and intentionally cause harm. 
The school will build awareness amongst children and parents about ensuring that the child:

That parents should:

The school will raise awareness by:

 

Part 2 – Safeguarding issues relating to individual pupil needs

Pupils with medical conditions (in school).

Supporting pupils at school with medical conditions

There is a separate policy outlining the school’s position on this.

As a school we will make sure that sufficient staff are trained to support any pupil with a medical condition.
All relevant staff will be made aware of the condition to support the child and be aware of medical needs and risks to the child.
An individual healthcare plan may be put in place to support the child and their medical needs.

Pupils with medical conditions (out of school).

www.hants.gov.uk - inclusion service

There will be occasions when children are temporarily unable to attend our school on a full time basis because of their medical needs. These children and young people are likely to be:

Where it is clear that an absence will be for more than 15 continuous school days the Education and Inclusion Service will be contacted to support with the pupil’s education.

Intimate care

http://4lscb.proceduresonline.com/chapters/g_int_care.html

See Guidelines for good practice Annex 1 (adapted from the Chailey Heritage centre)

Fabricated or induced illness
Safeguarding_Children_in_whom_illness_is_fabricated_or_induced
http://4lscb.proceduresonline.com/chapters/p_fab_ind_ill.html

There are three main ways that a carer could fabricate or induce illness in a child. These are not mutually exclusive and include:

If we are concerned that a child may be suffering from fabricated or induced illness we will follow the established procedures of the Hampshire Safeguarding Children Board.

Mental Health
Mental_Health_and_Behaviour_-_advice_for_Schools 
www.youngminds.org.uk 
The mental health strategy for england

Form tutors and class teachers see their pupils day in, day out. They know them well and are well placed to spot changes in behaviour that might indicate an emerging problem with the mental health and emotional wellbeing of pupils.
The balance between the risk and protective factors are most likely to be disrupted when difficult events happen in pupils’ lives. These include:

When concerns are identified, school staff will provide opportunities for the child to talk or receive support within the school environment. Parents will be informed of the concerns and a shared way to support the child will be discussed.
Where the needs require additional professional support referrals will be made to the appropriate team or service with the parent’s agreement (or child’s if they are competent as per Fraser guidelines).

 

Part 3 – Other safeguarding issues impacting pupils

Bullying
http://4lscb.proceduresonline.com/chapters/p_bullying.html
Preventing and tackling bullying 
www3.hants.gov.uk - childrens services - bullying

The school works to a separate Anti-bullying policy

Prejudice based abuse

Prejudice based abuse or hate crime is any criminal offence which is perceived by the victim or any other person to be motivated by a hostility or prejudice based on a person’s real or perceived:

Although this sort of crime is collectively known as 'Hate Crime' the offender doesn't have to go as far as being motivated by 'hate', they only have to exhibit 'hostility'.

This can be evidenced by:

As a school we will respond by:

Drugs and substance misuse
Drugs advice for schools 
www3.hants.gov.uk - resources for schools

The school works to a separate drug policy.

Faith Abuse
National action plan to tackle child abuse linked to faith or belief
http://4lscb.proceduresonline.com/chapters/p_ca_religion.html

The number of known cases of child abuse linked to accusations of “possession” or “witchcraft” is small, but children involved can suffer damage to their physical and mental health, their capacity to learn, their ability to form relationships and to their self-esteem.
Such abuse generally occurs when a carer views a child as being “different”, attributes this difference to the child being “possessed” or involved in “witchcraft” and attempts to exorcise him or her.
A child could be viewed as “different” for a variety of reasons such as, disobedience; independence; bed-wetting; nightmares; illness; or disability. There is often a weak bond of attachment between the carer and the child.
There are various social reasons that make a child more vulnerable to an accusation of “possession” or “witchcraft”. These include family stress and/or a change in the family structure.
The attempt to “exorcise” may involve severe beating, burning, starvation, cutting or stabbing and isolation, and usually occurs in the household where the child lives.

If the school become aware of a child who is being abused in this context, the DSL will follow the normal referral route in to children’s social care.

Gangs and Youth Violence
Preventing_youth_violence_and_gang_involvement
http://4lscb.proceduresonline.com/chapters/p_safeg_gang_activity.html

The vast majority of young people will not be affected by serious violence or gangs. However, where these problems do occur, even at low levels there will almost certainly be a significant impact.
As a school we have a duty and a responsibility to protect our pupils. It is also well established that success in learning is one of the most powerful indicators in the prevention of youth crime. Dealing with violence also helps attainment. While pupils generally see educational establishments as safe places, even low levels of youth violence can have a disproportionate impact on any education.
Primary schools are also increasingly recognised as places where early warning signs that younger children may be at risk of getting involved in gangs can be spotted. Crucial preventive work can be done within school to prevent negative behaviour from escalating and becoming entrenched.

As a school we will:

Private fostering

Children act- 989 - private fostering 
www3.hants.gov.uk - private fostering

Private fostering is an arrangement by a child’s parents for their child (under 16 or 18 if disabled) to be cared for by another adult who is not closely related and is not a legal guardian with parental responsibility for 28 days or more.
It is not private fostering if the carer is a close relative to the child such as grandparent, brother, sister, uncle or aunt.

The Law requires that the carers and parents must notify the children’s services department of any private fostering arrangement.

If the school becomes aware that a pupil is being privately fostered we will inform the children’s services department and inform both the parents and carers that we have done so.

Parenting

All parents will struggle with the behaviour of their child(ren) at some point. This does not make them poor parents or generate safeguarding concerns. Rather it makes them human and provides them with opportunities to learn and develop new skills and approaches to deal with their child(ren).
Some children have medical conditions and/or needs e.g. Tourette’s, some autistic linked conditions, ADHD; that have a direct impact on behaviour and can cause challenges for parents in dealing with behaviours. This does not highlight poor parenting either.

Parenting becomes a safeguarding concern when the repeated lack of supervision, boundaries, basic care or medical treatment places the child(ren) in situations of risk or harm.

In situations where parents struggle with tasks such as setting boundaries and providing appropriate supervision, timely interventions can make drastic changes to the wellbeing and life experiences of the child(ren) without the requirement for a social work assessment or plan being in place.

As a school we will support parents in understanding the parenting role and provide them with strategies to make a difference by:

Part 4 –Safeguarding processes

Safer Recruitment

Keeping children safe in education

The school operates a separate safer recruitment process as part of the school’s Recruitment Policy. On all recruitment panels there is at least one member who has undertaken safer recruitment training.
The process checks the identity, criminal record (enhanced DBS), mental and physical capacity, right to work in the U.K., professional qualification and seeks confirmation of the applicant’s experience and history through references.

Staff Induction

The DSL or their deputy will provide all new staff with training to enable them to both fulfil their role and also to understand the child protection policy, the safeguarding policy, the staff behaviour policy/code of conduct, and part one of Keeping Children Safe in Education.
This induction may be covered within the annual training if this falls at the same time; otherwise it will be carried out separately during the initial starting period.

Health and Safety

Health and safety advice for schools 
www.hse.gov.uk - education

The site, the equipment and the activities carried out as part of the curriculum are all required to comply with the Health and Safety at Work act 1974 and regulations made under the act.

All risks are required to be assessed and recorded plans of how to manage the risk are in place. The plans should always take a common sense and proportionate approach to allow activities to be safe rather than preventing them from taking place. The school has a Health and Safety policy which details the actions that we take in more detail.

Site Security

School security

We aim to provide a secure site, but recognise that the site is only as secure as the people who use it. Therefore all people on the site have to adhere to the rules which govern it. These are:

Off site visits

www.hants.gov.uk - outdoor_education
www.hampshireoutdoors.com 
www.oeapng.info - Educational Visits Coordinator 

A particular strand of health and safety is looking at risks when undertaking off site visits. Some activities, especially those happening away from the school and residential visits, can involve higher levels of risk. If these are annual or infrequent activities, a review of an existing assessment may be all that is needed. If it is a new activity, a visit involving adventure activities, residential, overseas or an ‘Open Country’ visit, a specific assessment of significant risks must be carried out. The school has an educational visits coordinator (EVC) who liaises with the local authority’s outdoor education adviser and helps colleagues in schools to manage risks and support with off site visits and provides training in the management of groups during off site visits, as well as First Aid in an outdoor context.

First Aid

First aid in schools

There is a separate First Aid policy .

Physical Intervention (use of reasonable force)
Use of reasonable force in schools   (guidelines for the use of restrictive physical intervention in Hampshire maintained schools)

As a school we have a separate policy outlining how we will use physical intervention.


Taking and the use and storage of images
www.ico.org.uk

As a school we will seek consent from the parent of a pupil and from teachers and other adults before taking and publishing photographs or videos that contain images that are sufficiently detailed to identify the individual in school publications, printed media or on electronic publications.
We will not seek consent for photos where you would not be able to identify the individual.

We will seek consent for the period the pupil remains registered with us and, unless we have specific written permission we will remove photographs after a child (or teacher) appearing in them leaves the school or if consent is withdrawn.

Photographs will only be taken on school owned equipment and stored on the school network. No images of pupils will be taken or stored on privately owned equipment by staff members.

Transporting pupils
http://documents.hants.gov.uk/education/LADOsafeguardingchildrenineducation2014templateletterforparent.doc

On occasions parents and volunteers support with the task of transporting children to visits and off-site activities arranged by the school. (This is in addition to any informal arrangements made directly between parents for after school clubs etc.)
In managing these arrangements the school will put in place measures to ensure the safety and welfare of young people carried in parents’ and volunteers’ cars. This is based on guidance from the local authority and follows similar procedures for school staff using their cars on school business.

Where parents’/volunteers’ cars are used on school activities the school will notify
parents/volunteers of their responsibilities for the safety of pupils, to maintain suitable
insurance cover and to ensure their vehicle is roadworthy.

All parents/volunteers are therefore asked to complete and return the form attached as annex 3 to the school before they offer to use their car to help with transporting pupils.


Disqualification under the childcare act
 Disqualification under the childcare act 2006

The childcare act of 2006 was put in place to prevent adults who have been cautioned or convicted of a number of specific offences from working within childcare.

Staff (meaning individuals employed by the school or local authority, those undertaking training in schools (both salaried and unsalaried), casual workers and volunteers) are covered by this legislation in the following circumstances:

In 2009 additional regulations were made to include those living in the same household as another person who is (or would be) disqualified under the Act.

As a school we require all staff who may be impacted by this piece of legislation to complete a self declaration form and to inform the Headteacher immediately if they become aware of any changes to their circumstances that would require us to be aware.

If a member of staff is impacted by the disqualification by association provisions we will ask them to apply for a waiver from Ofsted and put in place appropriate risk management plans while the waiver is being processed.
If a waiver is not granted we will seek advice from our HR provider and/or the LADO as to how risk is most effectively managed.

 


Annex’s

Intimate care

Guidelines for good practice adapted from the Chailey Heritage centre

1. Treat every child with dignity and respect and ensure privacy appropriate to the child’s age and the situation. Privacy is an important issue. Much intimate care is carried out by one staff member alone with one child. The 4LSCBs believe this practice should be actively supported unless the task requires two people. Having people working alone does increase the opportunity for possible abuse. However, this is balanced by the loss of privacy and lack of trust implied if two people have to be present - quite apart form the practical difficulties. It should also be noted that the presence of two people does not guarantee the safety of the child or young person - organised abuse by several perpetrators can, and does, take place. Therefore, staff should be supported in carrying out the intimate care of children alone unless the task requires the presence of two people. The 4LSCBs recognise that there are partner agencies that recommend two carers in specific circumstances. Where possible, the member of staff carrying out intimate care should be someone chosen by the child or young person. For older children it is preferable if the member of staff is the same gender as the young person. However, this is not always possible in practice. Agencies should consider the implications of using a single named member of staff for intimate care or a rota system in terms of risks of abuse.

2. Involve the child as far as possible in his or her own intimate care. Try to avoid doing things for a child that s/he can do alone, and if a child is able to help ensure that s/he is given the chance to do so. This is as important for tasks such as removing underclothes as it is for washing the private parts of a child’s body. Support children in doing all that they can themselves. If a child is fully dependent on you, talk with her or him about what you are doing and give choices where possible.

3. Be responsive to a child’s reactions. It is appropriate to “check” your practice by asking the child - particularly a child you have not previously cared for - “Is it OK to do it this way?”; “Can you wash there?; “How does mummy do that?”. If a child expresses dislike of a certain person carrying out her or his intimate care, try and find out why. Conversely, if a child has a “grudge” against you or dislikes you for some reason, ensure your line manager is aware of this.

4. Make sure practice in intimate care is as consistent as possible. Line managers have a responsibility for ensuring their staff have a consistent approach. This does not mean that everyone has to do things in an identical fashion, but it is important that approaches to intimate care are not markedly different between individuals. For example, do you use a flannel to wash a child’s private parts rather than bare hands? Do you pull back a child’s foreskin as part of daily washing? Is care during menstruation consistent across different staff?

5. Never do something unless you know how to do it. If you are not sure how to do something, ask. If you need to be shown more than once, ask again. Certain intimate care or treatment procedures, such as rectal examinations, must only be carried out by nursing or medical staff. Other procedures, such as giving rectal valium, suppositories or intermittent catheterisation, must only be carried out by staff who have been formally trained and assessed as competent.

6. If you are concerned that during the intimate care of a child:

Report any such incident as soon as possible to another person working with you and make a brief written note of it. This is for two reasons: first, because some of these could be cause for concern, and secondly, because the child or another adult might possibly misconstrue something you have done.

7. Additionally, if you are a member of staff who has noticed that a child’s demeanour has changed directly following intimate care, e.g. sudden distress or withdrawal, this should be noted in writing and discussed with your designated person for child protection.

8. Encourage the child to have a positive image of her or his own body. Confident, assertive children who feel their body belongs to them are less vulnerable to abuse. As well as the basics like privacy, the approach you take to a child’s intimate care can convey lots of messages about what her or his body is “worth”. Your attitude to the child’s intimate care is important. As far as appropriate and keeping in mind the child’s age, routine care of a child should be enjoyable, relaxed and fun.

Intimate care is to some extent individually defined, and varies according to personal experience, cultural expectations and gender. The 4LSCBs recognise that children who experience intimate care may be more vulnerable to abuse:-

Annex 2

Annex 3

 Transporting of pupils by parents

 

Dear Parent / Volunteer

On occasions parents and volunteers are kind enough to help with the task of transporting children to visits and off-site activities arranged by the school. (This is in addition to any informal arrangements made directly between parents for after school clubs etc.) The school is very grateful for this help. In managing these arrangements the school would like to put in place sensible measures to ensure the safety and welfare of young people carried in parents and volunteers cars. This is based on guidance from the local authority and follows similar procedures for school staff using their cars on school business.

Where parents/volunteers cars are used on school activities the Head should notify
parents/volunteers of their responsibilities for the safety of pupils, to maintain suitable
insurance cover and to ensure their vehicle is roadworthy.

The Head or Party Leader will need to consider the suitability of parents or volunteers to
carry young people in their car and whether vetting is necessary. It is advisable that parents or volunteers are not put in a position where they are alone with a young person.

All parents are therefore asked to complete and return the attached form to the school before they offer to use their car to help with transporting pupils.

This form will only need to be completed once for each driver. However, please inform the school if your circumstances change and you can no longer comply with these arrangements.

Many thanks, once again, to all parents and volunteers who have been able to help with the provision of transport. Naturally our primary concern is the safety and welfare of pupils. However, we also want to maintain a wide range of opportunities for young people to participate in off-site activities and visits.

Signed

 

Head Teacher

DECLARATION FORM
Safeguarding statement

At this school, we strongly recognise the need for vigilant awareness of safeguarding issues. It is important that all staff have appropriate training and induction so that they understand their roles and responsibilities and are confident about carrying them out. Staff, pupils, parents and governors should feel secure that they could raise any issues or concerns about the safety or welfare of children and know that they will be listened to and taken seriously. This will be achieved by maintaining an ethos of safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children and young people and protecting staff. This is supported by clear behaviour, anti-bullying and child protection policies, appropriate induction and training, briefing and discussion of relevant issues and relevant learning in line with current legislation and guidelines.

The school may require parents or volunteers who have regular unsupervised access to young people to be checked through arrangements with the Disclosure and Barring Service.

All drivers must:
• Hold a valid driving licence for the type of vehicle being driven
• Be fit to drive
• Have no medical condition which affects their ability to drive
• Have a valid MOT for any vehicle older than 3 years old
• Ensure that any vehicle is roadworthy, including brakes, lights, tyres, bodywork, wipers, mirrors etc.
• Ensure that any vehicle used has current road tax
• Ensure that they adhere to the appropriate speed limit
• Ensure that all seat belts are working and worn by everybody in the vehicle
Insurance:
• Maintain valid insurance, as a minimum, for third part liability
• Check with their insurance company and inform them that the driver occasionally conveys children on school activities. (This is unlikely to affect the cost of your insurance premium.)
Safety:
• Be familiar with, and drive in accordance with, the Highway Code at all times
• Drive safely and observe the speed limit
• Before driving not to consume alcohol or drugs which may impair driving
• Ensure that all passengers wear seat belts as appropriate
• Use child proof locks on rear doors where necessary
• Child seats such as booster seats are to be used at all times according to the height and age of each child in the vehicle

I have read and understood the above requirements and agree to comply with them.
I agree to inform the school if circumstances change and I can no longer comply with
these arrangements.

Signature: Date:

Name (Please print)
Number of seats in vehicle: